Posts Tagged ‘Baby Development’

Brushing Baby’s Teeth

Baby teeth, also known as “milk teeth”, usually start to appear between six and seven months. The teeth cutting their way through the gums are most often a slow and painful process as the teeth grows.

 

Brushing Baby Teeth

Your baby’s primary teeth may be only a temporary tool for chomping, to be replaced during the early school years by his permanent pearls. But it’s no less important to take good care of them now and to establish the habits that will lead him toward a lifetime of dental health. Decayed or lost baby teeth can interfere with good nutrition and speech development, and by not holding a proper place for permanent teeth, they can make the permanent ones come in crooked.

WHEN SHOULD I START BRUSHING MY BABY’S TEETH?

Tooth brushing can begin as soon as baby’s first tooth pokes through the gums. Use a clean, damp washcloth, a gauze pad, or a finger brush to gently wipe clean the first teeth and the front of the tongue, after meals and at bedtime. Toothbrushes — moistened with water and no more than a rice-grain size smear of fluoride toothpaste — can also be used, but they should be very soft and with no more than three rows of bristles (a pediatric dentist or your pharmacist can help you find the finger brushes and a proper baby toothbrush). Toss any toothbrushes that have become rough at the edges (or that are more than two to four months old, because nasty mouth bacteria can begin to build up).

SHOULD  I BRUSH MY BABY’S GUMS?

Pediatric dentists recommend cleaning baby’s gums after feedings, which helps fight bacterial growth and promotes good oral health, long before baby’s first teeth start to appear. Rather than cleaning baby’s gums with a toothbrush, try a soft, damp cloth, or even a soft rubber or silicone finger brush, both gentle options with a nubby texture babies tend to love.

CAN BABIES USE FLUORIDE TOOTHPASTE?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends using cavity-preventing fluoride toothpaste starting with baby’s very first tooth, rather than waiting until age 2 as was previously recommended. Use a rice-grain-sized smear of toothpaste for your baby or toddler, graduating to a pea-sized dollop by age three. And don’t worry if your baby swallows some of the toothpaste (as she almost certainly will)—in such a small quantity, it won’t cause any damage to the teeth. Starting in the second year, you can teach your toddler to spit after brushing.

TEACHING BABY TO BRUSH

Your older baby or toddler will probably want to try his hand at brushing himself; let him give it a go (if he has the dexterity and doesn’t just get frustrated), but be sure to follow up with a more thorough cleaning of your own, using a finger brush

Your baby’s primary teeth may be only a temporary tool for chomping, to be replaced during the early school years by his permanent pearls. But it’s no less important to take good care of them now and to establish the habits that will lead him toward a lifetime of dental health. Decayed or lost baby teeth can interfere with good nutrition and speech development, and by not holding a proper place for permanent teeth, they can make the permanent ones come in crooked.

WHEN SHOULD I START BRUSHING MY BABY’S TEETH?

Tooth brushing can begin as soon as baby’s first tooth pokes through the gums. Use a clean, damp washcloth, a gauze pad, or a finger brush to gently wipe clean the first teeth and the front of the tongue, after meals and at bedtime. Toothbrushes — moistened with water and no more than a rice-grain size smear of fluoride toothpaste — can also be used, but they should be very soft and with no more than three rows of bristles (a pediatric dentist or your pharmacist can help you find the finger brushes and a proper baby toothbrush). Toss any toothbrushes that have become rough at the edges (or that are more than two to four months old, because nasty mouth bacteria can begin to build up).

SHOULD  I BRUSH MY BABY’S GUMS?

Pediatric dentists recommend cleaning baby’s gums after feedings, which helps fight bacterial growth and promotes good oral health, long before baby’s first teeth start to appear. Rather than cleaning baby’s …

 

Read more: http://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/teething/brushing-baby-teeth.aspx

Vitamin D in your pregnancy diet

Vitamin D is one of the pregnancy vitamins that every woman should consider adding to her regime. Health researchers have found that this vitamin benefits both mother and baby.

 

Why you need vitamin D during pregnancy

Your body needs vitamin D to maintain proper levels of calcium andphosphorus, which help build your baby’s bones and teeth.

What happens if you don’t get enough vitamin D

Vitamin D deficiency is common during pregnancy. Inadequate vitamin D can lead to abnormal bone growth, fractures, or rickets in newborns.

Some studies link vitamin D deficiency to a higher risk of pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, preterm birth, and low birth weight, but more research is needed to confirm these links.

The symptoms of a vitamin D deficiency can be subtle. They may include achy muscles, weakness, bone pain, and softened bones, which may lead to fractures.

You can also have a vitamin D deficiency without any symptoms. And if that happens while you’re pregnant, your baby can suffer a deficiency, too.

How much vitamin D you need

Vitamin D dosage is a topic of debate. The Institute of Medicine currently recommends that all women – whether or not they’re pregnant or breastfeeding – get 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D or 15 micrograms (mcg) each day.

But many experts believe that 600 IU isn’t nearly enough. The Linus Pauling Institute, for example, recommends all adults take 2,000 IU of supplemental vitamin D each day. The Endocrine Society says 600 IU may be enough, but some people – including pregnant and breastfeeding women – may need 1,500 to 2,000 IU of vitamin D.

In 2015, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists stated that more safety research is needed before the organization would recommend more vitamin D than what’s in a standard prenatal vitamin. Ask your healthcare provider for advice about how much vitamin D you need during pregnancy.

Food sources of vitamin D

Fish liver oil, fatty fish, and eggs all contain vitamin D. But not many other foods contain vitamin D naturally, so a lot are fortified with this important vitamin. Be sure to check labels: Some cheeses, yogurts, and cereals are fortified while others aren’t. (All milk is vitamin D fortified.)

Here are some of the best food sources of vitamin D:

  • 3 ounces canned pink salmon: 465 IU (11.6 mcg)

 

Read more: http://www.babycenter.com/0_vitamin-d-in-your-pregnancy-diet_661.bc