Posts Tagged ‘Child Care’

Brushing Baby’s Teeth

Baby teeth, also known as “milk teeth”, usually start to appear between six and seven months. The teeth cutting their way through the gums are most often a slow and painful process as the teeth grows.

 

Brushing Baby Teeth

Your baby’s primary teeth may be only a temporary tool for chomping, to be replaced during the early school years by his permanent pearls. But it’s no less important to take good care of them now and to establish the habits that will lead him toward a lifetime of dental health. Decayed or lost baby teeth can interfere with good nutrition and speech development, and by not holding a proper place for permanent teeth, they can make the permanent ones come in crooked.

WHEN SHOULD I START BRUSHING MY BABY’S TEETH?

Tooth brushing can begin as soon as baby’s first tooth pokes through the gums. Use a clean, damp washcloth, a gauze pad, or a finger brush to gently wipe clean the first teeth and the front of the tongue, after meals and at bedtime. Toothbrushes — moistened with water and no more than a rice-grain size smear of fluoride toothpaste — can also be used, but they should be very soft and with no more than three rows of bristles (a pediatric dentist or your pharmacist can help you find the finger brushes and a proper baby toothbrush). Toss any toothbrushes that have become rough at the edges (or that are more than two to four months old, because nasty mouth bacteria can begin to build up).

SHOULD  I BRUSH MY BABY’S GUMS?

Pediatric dentists recommend cleaning baby’s gums after feedings, which helps fight bacterial growth and promotes good oral health, long before baby’s first teeth start to appear. Rather than cleaning baby’s gums with a toothbrush, try a soft, damp cloth, or even a soft rubber or silicone finger brush, both gentle options with a nubby texture babies tend to love.

CAN BABIES USE FLUORIDE TOOTHPASTE?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends using cavity-preventing fluoride toothpaste starting with baby’s very first tooth, rather than waiting until age 2 as was previously recommended. Use a rice-grain-sized smear of toothpaste for your baby or toddler, graduating to a pea-sized dollop by age three. And don’t worry if your baby swallows some of the toothpaste (as she almost certainly will)—in such a small quantity, it won’t cause any damage to the teeth. Starting in the second year, you can teach your toddler to spit after brushing.

TEACHING BABY TO BRUSH

Your older baby or toddler will probably want to try his hand at brushing himself; let him give it a go (if he has the dexterity and doesn’t just get frustrated), but be sure to follow up with a more thorough cleaning of your own, using a finger brush

Your baby’s primary teeth may be only a temporary tool for chomping, to be replaced during the early school years by his permanent pearls. But it’s no less important to take good care of them now and to establish the habits that will lead him toward a lifetime of dental health. Decayed or lost baby teeth can interfere with good nutrition and speech development, and by not holding a proper place for permanent teeth, they can make the permanent ones come in crooked.

WHEN SHOULD I START BRUSHING MY BABY’S TEETH?

Tooth brushing can begin as soon as baby’s first tooth pokes through the gums. Use a clean, damp washcloth, a gauze pad, or a finger brush to gently wipe clean the first teeth and the front of the tongue, after meals and at bedtime. Toothbrushes — moistened with water and no more than a rice-grain size smear of fluoride toothpaste — can also be used, but they should be very soft and with no more than three rows of bristles (a pediatric dentist or your pharmacist can help you find the finger brushes and a proper baby toothbrush). Toss any toothbrushes that have become rough at the edges (or that are more than two to four months old, because nasty mouth bacteria can begin to build up).

SHOULD  I BRUSH MY BABY’S GUMS?

Pediatric dentists recommend cleaning baby’s gums after feedings, which helps fight bacterial growth and promotes good oral health, long before baby’s first teeth start to appear. Rather than cleaning baby’s …

 

Read more: http://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/teething/brushing-baby-teeth.aspx

Nanny care: Advantages and disadvantages

A proper child care environment is extremely important for the positive physical and mental well being and proper nurturing of a child. In the home the caring of the youngsters is carried out by the family of the child and when a nanny is employed, a nanny background check is a necessity.

 

What are the advantages of having a nanny?

Parents who have good nannies swear by them. They like not having to deal with the politics of relying on a relative or with the hassle of daily pickups and drop-offs at a center.

Getting to stay at home. “Mornings aren’t particularly stressful in my home since I don’t have to bundle Megan out the door, dressed and ready,” says Moira French, a working mom. With nanny care, your baby stays in familiar surroundings, and she can nap and eat on her own schedule.

One-on-one care. Some parents also say it’s comforting to know their child doesn’t have to vie with other children for attention as she would in a daycare setting. Naomi Langer, an architect in Los Angeles, says she was instantly sold on the idea of hiring a nanny because her daughter would get individual care every day. “I was worried that if she was in daycare, she wouldn’t be the first one tended to when she cried or needed something.”

Flexibility. Scheduling can also be more flexible with a nanny than with a daycare center that closes at the same time every day. When you hire a nanny, discuss in advance how you’ll handle last-minute changes. That way, you’ll know how much wiggle room the nanny has in her schedule, and the nanny will know what the pay rate will be for the extra time.

 

What are the disadvantages?

Nanny care is largely unsupervised, making it doubly important that you find someone you trust, says Mary O’Connor, former president of the International Nanny Association. And you’ll have to scramble to find another if your nanny decides to leave.

No backup care options. “We switched our son to a daycare center after our third nanny in 13 months quit on us,” says Susan Webb, a mother in Amherst, Massachusetts. “We wanted a situation that wouldn’t leave us in the lurch.” You can minimize the disruption of a nanny’s departure by specifying in your contract how much notice she has to give you – a month is customary. And that gives you some time to look for a replacement.

Less social interaction for your child. Your child’s social life is another issue: Daycare and preschool automatically put kids in everyday contact with peers, but home care doesn’t. To offset this drawback, you may want to sign your child up for classes or encourage the nanny to take her on regular outings for that important interaction with other kids.

Cost may be a factor. Nanny care can be the most expensive form of childcare. According to a survey by the International Nanny Association, the average pay for a nanny is around $700 a week, but that figure could vary quite a bit depending on where you live.

You may be able to pay less for a live-in arrangement – typically a dollar or two less per hour. If good nannies are at a premium in your area, you may need to sweeten the deal with perks such as a gym membership or use of a car.

Lack of privacy. Some parents may feel they’re sacrificing privacy by having a non-family caregiver in their home all day, rustling through the fridge to fix meals and going about all the other details of daily living.

Paperwork and legal hassles. An important consideration in deciding whether to hire a nanny is the necessary employer’s and Social Security taxes. Nannies are …

 

Read more: http://www.babycenter.com/0_nanny-care-advantages-and-disadvantages_6044.bc

5 Signs That You Are A Toxic Parent

When you relate lovingly with your child you provide your child with the finest natural and spiritual influence. With practice, you will find that you can gradually develop your ability to direct and correct your child’s behavior without breaking your deeply loving connection with your child.

You really are trying to do your best. Parenting didn’t come with a manual and if it did, you surely didn’t get a copy. Chances are, you are probably raising your child either the way you were raised OR you are trying to not raise them like that at all and doing a complete 360 of how your parents raised you. Either way, you think you are doing a darn good job. But are you? Could it possibly be that you might be a toxic parent without even realizing it?

Check these signs below and see if you fit in there anywhere. If you do, fear not, there is time to tweak your methods and improve your parenting skills.

toxic_parent1. Gossiping in front of the children.

First of all, gossiping is bad anyway, but when your children hear you talking about the neighbour Betty or if they hear you talking about one of their classmate’s parents, well, guess what? They are listening and can hear every word you say. They are also paying attention and you can be sure they will be repeating every word and forming a new habit. When we think our children are playing games and not paying attention is when they really are paying attention. Don’t assume they can’t hear you. They hear you loud and clear.

2. Fighting, name calling and disrespecting each other in front of the children (for those in relationships).

You should never do this in front of the children. Th is is not only toxic but very frightening for them. Take note of how you feel when you’re fighting and multiply this by a million. That’s how the children feel when you two are fighting. Not only that, name calling isn’t something you want your children to pick up on. Another toxic thing you don’t want them to do. If it’s ok for you, then why wouldn’t it be ok for them? You are their teachers, remember.

 

Read more: http://www.stevenaitchison.co.uk/blog/5-signs-toxic-parent/

Constipation in babies

Preventing constipation in babies is something that most parents will encounter. Constipation can be a relatively common problem for babies. There are several clues to watch for in determining if your baby is constipated.

 

How can I tell if my baby is constipated?

First, consider what’s normal for your baby. She may have a bowel movement after every feeding, or she may wait a day or more in between. Your baby’s individual pattern depends on what she eats and drinks, how active she is, and how quickly she digests food.

If your baby drinks formula or eats solid food, she’ll probably have a regular bowel movement at least once a day. If your baby is breastfed, there’s no “normal” number or schedule – only what’s typical for your baby. It’s not unheard of for breastfed babies to have one bowel movement a week.

After a while, you’ll be tuned in to your baby’s unique habits. If you’re concerned that your baby may be constipated, watch for these signs:

  • Less frequent bowel movements than usual, especially if your baby hasn’t had one for three or more days and is obviously uncomfortable when she does
  • Hard, dry stools that are difficult for her to pass – no matter how frequently

 

Why is my baby getting constipated?

There are several possible causes:

Solid food. Don’t be surprised if your baby becomes mildly constipated as he eats more solid food. That’s often because rice cereal – a common first food – is low in fiber. Constipation can also happen when you wean your baby from breast milk because this sometimes leads to dehydration.

Formula. Babies who breastfeed exclusively are rarely constipated. Breast milk has the perfect balance of fat and protein, so it produces stools that are almost always soft – even if your baby hasn’t had one for several days.

If your baby is on formula, it’s possible that something in his formula is making him constipated. It’s not uncommon for the protein component in different formulas to cause constipation. Ask your baby’s doctor about switching brands.

(Despite what you may have heard, the amount of iron in formula doesn’t cause constipation.)

Dehydration. If your baby becomes dehydrated, his system will respond by absorbing more fluid from whatever he eats or drinks – and also from the waste in his bowels. The result is hard, dry stools that are difficult to pass.

Illness or a medical condition. Although it’s uncommon, constipation can be caused by an underlying medical condition such as hypothyroidism, botulism, and certain food allergies and metabolic disorders. Rarely, constipation is caused by Hirschsprung’s disease, a condition caused by a birth defect that prevents a baby’s gut from functioning properly.

 

Read more: http://www.babycenter.com/0_constipation-in-babies_79.bc

5 Best Bottle Warmers in 2016

 

Today, many companies have developed warmers for baby feeding bottle in order to help nursing mothers heat up their bottles easily without losing the nutrient contained in the breast milk or other babies’ food in the bottle that is being heat.

 

As a parent, having a bottle warmer can make things much easier when it comes to feeding your baby. There are many choices available in this particular category, but which is the best? To find out, we reviewed some of the best bottle warmers on the market in 2016 and came up with a top five.

Rank #1 #2 #3 #3 #5

Dr. Brown’s Bottle Warmer

Born Free Tru-Temp Warming System

Boon Orb Bottle Warmer

Philips AVENT Express

Munchkin Deluxe Bottle & Food Warmer
Specifications
Weight: 2 lbs 1 lbs 1.3 lbs 1 lbs 1.6 lbs
LCD control panel: yes yes no no no
Audiable alarm: yes no no no no
Memory: yes no no no no

#5 Munchkin Deluxe Bottle & Food Warmer

fifth place

The Muchkin Deluxe Bottle and Food Warmer is a product at the budget end of the market and provides enough room for any size baby bottle or food jar, producing evenly warmed milk in around 5 minutes. Obviously, that is a lot slower than the microwave, but cold and hot spots within the contents are avoided. A handy alarm sound and automatic shut off means you do not have to worry about overheating a bottle; however, defrosting and warming frozen milk can be quite tricky.

#4 Philips AVENT Bottle Warmer, Fast

avent product

The AVENT range is quite popular with parents and this Bottle Warmer will not disappoint Philips’ fans. This machine is not spectacular in its performance and is rather complicated to fill, largely due to a poor instruction manual. On the plus side though, the warmer looks great and, as ever with Philips, is well made and with plenty of room for any size bottle or jar. It is also decently priced too, which will appeal greatly to fans of the range.

 

Read more: http://2yum.me/equipment/best-bottle-warmers