What Your Garden’s Weeds are Trying to Tell You

Weeds stick out like a sore thumb in yards because they may be of a different color, size or texture. They are distracting from the beauty of the otherwise sprawling green turf.

 

The best way to learn about your soil’s health is to get a soil test through your local cooperative extension service or at a local nursery. However, there are a few simple things you can do to get a general idea about your soil’s health. One of the best ways to find out more about your soil is to observe what’s growing well in it.Different weeds thrive in different conditions. Note that we’re not talking about one or two weeds here. If you’re seeing several of the same weed in an area, that can give you a good general idea of what type of conditions you have in that spot. Here are some common weeds to look for, and what their presence means. Where possible, I’ve linked to a photo of the weed so you can identify them more easily.

Weeds, and What They Mean

Photo Credit: Joost J. Bakker Ijmuiden, Flickr Creative Commons.

  • Bindweed: This morning glory relative, a vining plant with white and pink blossoms, thrives in compacted soil.
  • Chickweed: This low, spreading annual weed is a sign of high fertility.
  • Chicory: Chicory is most easily identifiable by its bright blue flowers. You’ll often find this plant growing along roadsides, where it is a sign of compacted soil.
  • Dandelion: Probably the most easily identified weed on this list, the dandelion is common just about everywhere but will absolutely thrive in acidic soil.
  • Henbane: Henbane, also called “black henbane,” is common in the northwestern U.S. as well as southern Canada. It is a sign of alkaline soil.
  • Horsetail: This perennial weed, which spreads both by spores and rhizomes, thrives in damp, poorly-drained soils.

 

See more: http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/what-your-gardens-weeds-are-trying-to-tell-you.html

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